Arts and Culture

Why is this important?

A thriving arts and cultural community is a sign of a city’s ability to innovate, to solve problems, to attract visitors, and to entice talented new residents from around the world. Toronto’s lively arts environment helps to welcome and integrate newcomers, celebrate our heritage, and imagine a better city. It is also a key sector that contributes substantially to our local, provincial, and national economies.

 

What are the trends?

The City’s 2015 budget upheld Council’s commitment to reaching $25 per capita arts funding by 2017. But even at that amount, Toronto’s spending on arts and culture will remain outshone by many other Canadian cities. Although professional employment in arts and culture in Toronto declined slightly in 2014, it remained higher than in 2012. Film, television, and other screen-based media production spending exceeded $1b for the fifth year in a row in 2015. The Toronto Public Library remains among the world’s largest and busiest public library systems.

 

What’s new?

Most Torontonians want to engage with art in public spaces, and new initiatives are promising to bring more art to local parks. The City has appointed its inaugural Photo Laureate, and the Royal Ontario Museum will become the first major museum in Canada to digitize its collection for online viewing. An audit by the Province’s Auditor General found that the Toronto 2015 Pan Am Games went over budget by $342m, but also generated more revenue than anticipated. Torontonians are split on whether the City should bid on Expo 2025.

How do Torontonians and the City contribute to, and benefit from, the city’s exciting cultural environment?

The City’s 2016 budget saw Council uphold its commitment to reaching $25 per capita arts funding by 2017:

  • The City’s 2016 operating budget allocated $58.6m to make possible arts and cultural services.[1]
    • The City planned to add 14 new works to its public art collection and to commission eight new public artworks in 2016.[2]
  • The 2016 budget included $5m to support the Arts and Culture $25 per capita funding phase-in.[3]
    • In 2015 net expenditures for the City’s total cultural spending including capital expenditures, was $24.07 per capita.[4]
  • The Toronto Arts Council (TAC) had requested an additional $3m in grants funding for 2016 to build on its priorities of growth and sustainability, community connections, and innovation and partnerships, but the budget did not include this increase and 2.75m is pending approval.[5]
  • The City disbursed a total of $27.8m in grant allocations in 2015 through the TAC, major cultural and local arts service organizations, and other organizations such as the Royal Winter Fair, the Design Exchange, and community museums.[6]

 

Attendance at cultural events reflects Toronto’s deep engagement in arts, culture, and heritage and brings significant economic benefit to the city:

  • Over 19 million people attended City-funded or City-programmed cultural events in 2015.
  • More than half a million people visit the 21 City-operated museums, historic sites, cultural centres and art galleries every year.[7]
  • According to the Toronto Arts Foundation’s analysis of the 2013 audited financial statements of CADAC (Canadian Arts Data/Données sur les arts au Canada), every dollar the City spends on the not-for-profit arts sector generates $8.25 in revenue and $11.77 from other sectors and level of governments.[8]

 

Torontonians see the arts as having a positive influence in the neighbourhoods they live in, their individual lives, and the city they call home:

  • Toronto Art Stats: Public Opinion 2016 compiles the results of an online survey of 500 Toronto residents conducted in January 2016 by Leger for the Toronto Arts Foundation.
  • 69% of Torontonians appreciate the contribution that local artists make to the city. 57% agree that support for the arts should be a priority for local businesses, and 54% agree that funding the arts should be a priority for local government.
  • 71% of Torontonians attend arts-related programs or events or visit cultural locations on a regular basis.
    • Concerts (58%), museums (55%), and film showings (54%) are the top three events attended on a regular basis. Dance (19%) and readings (7%) are the least popular.[9]
    • 2009 American research found that people who attended art galleries or live performances, or read literature, were more likely to vote, volunteer, and take part in community events, and that 58% of adults who visited an art museum or gallery volunteered in their communities, compared to only 24% of those who did not.[10]
  • Over a quarter (29%) of Torontonians go beyond attendance with their engagement in the arts. The most popular contribution is donating to an arts organization (10%), followed by being a member of an amateur arts group (7%), and being a student in arts classes or lessons or participating in a community arts project (both 6%).

 

Engagement Beyond Attendance in the Arts, 2016:

Engagement Beyond Attendance in Arts Toronto Arts Fdn

 

  • 44% reported they would like to get more involved in the arts.
    • The overwhelming majority of Torontonians (96%) see at least one benefit that the arts provide to the city, such as
    • attracting tourists (75%);
    • making the city a better place to live (67%);
    • creating employment (52%); and
    • attracting people to move here (32%).
    • There was an 8% decrease compared to 2015, however, in the percentage who think that arts improve the city’s economy.

 

Benefits of the Arts to Toronto, 2016:

Benefits of Arts to TO Arts Fdn

 

  • 87% see at least one benefit of the arts to their neighbourhood, and the percentage of respondents who think the arts create a stronger sense of community increased by 10% over 2015 to 60%.
  • 91% of Torontonians see at least one benefit that the arts provide to themselves. 59%, for example, report that the arts expose them to new ideas, and 46% say they make them feel proud of their city.
  • 71% agree that the arts reflect the diversity of the city’s population, 64% agree that they can make one feel included, and 57% agree that they deal with important issues.
  • The vast majority of respondents (81%) view opportunities to participate in arts for children and youth as important.
  • Young Torontonians are more likely to see the arts as making a greater contribution in their lives. 72% of 18-24 year olds want to get more involved in the arts (versus 40% of those 25 and older), and 71% of 18-24 year olds take a strong interest in arts and cultural traditions of their heritage (versus 45% of those 25+).
  • Despite high levels of support, interest, and engagement, 88% of respondents face at least one barrier to attending arts programming. Cost makes it difficult for 55% of those people to attend arts events, visit arts locations, or participate in arts activities.
    • 70% of households with an income of $100k or higher buy tickets to arts events compared to 49% of households making less.
    • 30% were aware of the free museum passes available through the Toronto Public Library but had not used them. Households with children under 18 were more likely to have used these passes (27% versus 11% without children).
    • The second most cited barrier to arts attendance is not knowing what is going on, which increased to 37% from just 15% in 2015. Other barriers include being too busy, 34%; distance from home, 31%; and inaccessibility of venues, 5%.[11]

 

The vast majority of Torontonians want to engage with art in public spaces:

  • 94% of respondents in the Toronto Art Stats survey saw benefits of art in public spaces. The most commonly cited benefits were that it is often free to enjoy art in public spaces (71%) and that art in public spaces introduces residents to new art experiences (61%).

Benefits of the Arts in Public Spaces, 2016 [12]

Benefits of Arts in Pub Spaces TO Arts Fdn

  • 84% of respondents had encountered art in a public space in the past year, 55% of them in parks and green spaces and 59% at street festivals.
  • Torontonians would like to experience all kinds of arts in their local parks, with half (52%) saying they would like to see performances by professional artists and visual arts by professional artists.[13]

 

Support for Different Types of Art in Public Parks, 2016 [14]

Support for Art in Pub Parks To Arts Fdn

 

In winter 2016, Toronto’s eastern waterfront was transformed with art installations at lifeguard stations, “Winter Stations”:

  • Out of 300 submissions, seven winners were chosen from OCADU, Ryerson University, Laurentian University and also independent artists.[15]

 

Beach Winter Station

 

The 416 Project,

created by Jorge Molina, involves the mounting of 416 original works of arts across 35 Toronto neighbourhoods, with the purpose of bringing more art into the public realm:

  • The public is invited to take home the art but are requested to tell the artist using email or social media.
  • The paintings can be found as far north as Willowdale, as far west as Islington Village and as far east as Scarborough Village.[16]

416 Art Project

Canvas 141

416 Project 2

Canvas 151

 

The Pan Am Path is a new Toronto asset infrastructure asset that combines the power of art and sport to create a living path across Toronto. It was conceived by Friends of the Pan Am Path (Friends), who formed in 2013 with the idea to connect Toronto’s extensive trail system and support local communities along the route with arts and culture programming and take advantage of the upcoming Toronto 2015 Pan Am Games as a catalyst.

In 2013, Toronto City Council approved the Pan Am Path and the creation of a continuous 80-kilometre trail:

  • The Path connects the region from Brampton to Pickering, connecting 20 Neighbourhood Improvement Areas (NIAs) and 16 Environmentally Significant Areas (ESAs).
  • Toronto Foundation has pledged $1 million dollars over 10 years to activate the path as a significant city-building asset.
  • The City of Toronto is investing over $30 million (estimated) to complete the Pan Am Path within the trails strategy.
  • The Path and Art Relay have been called “a cornerstone of the Pan Am Games Legacy” by Toronto Mayor John Tory.
  • The 2015 Pan Am Path Art Relay, involving 14 weeks of animation on the Path and engagement with more than 100 local partners – uniting the region with arts, culture and active-living opportunities. The Art Relay included:
    • 97 live performances,
    • 57 permanent and semi-permanent art pieces,
    • 38 eco or arts workshops and
    • 44 active-living activities.
    • The largest event, at Rouge Beach, had 1,200 participants.
  • In 2016, the Path is being animated by P4K Pathfinding, a collaboration between Playing for Keeps, Friends of the Pan Am Path, the Toronto Foundation, Jane’s Walk, Cycle TO and First Story Toronto.
    • Programming includes a series of seven talks, walks, games and rides on the Path.
    • Activities aim to connect young and established leaders in exploring Toronto’s trails and ravines.[17]

 

What steps have been taken to make art and culture more accessible?

In May 2016 Mayor Tory launched a program that would bring free summer performances, community-engaged arts, and installations to parks across the city, especially in underserved areas:

  • Arts in the Parks is a collaboration between the City (Arts & Culture Services and Parks, Forestry and Recreation departments), Park People, the Toronto Arts Foundation, and the Toronto Arts Council (TAC). TAC’s Animating Toronto Parks pilot program will fund artists and organizations bringing arts programming to any of the 23 parks outside the downtown core.[18]
  • Tory also announced a new, free Arts and Music in Parks permit that promises to make it easier for grassroots organizations, artists, and musicians to present small-scale, free, one-day art and music events in our parks.[19]
    • Events must offer no alcohol, food, rides, or games and keep noise below 85 decibels.
    • The permit was inspired by the red tape encountered in 2015 by the acoustic Great Heart Festival in Trinity Bellwoods park. Last year, organizers had to crowdfund for a $1,580 permit, $650 insurance, a $100 noise exemption, and taxes.
    • As of May 30, the City had approved 16 permits for the summer, with more expected.[20]

 

Toronto has appointed its inaugural Photo Laureate:

  • In 2016 renowned photographer Geoffrey James was appointed Photo Laureate, for a three-year term.[21]
  • The City’s Arts and Cultural Services section established the terms and conditions for the appointment and convened an advisory panel to select the candidate.
  • Arts and Cultural Services also oversaw the appointment in 2015 of Anne Michaels as the City’s fifth Poet Laureate for a three-year term. The outgoing fourth Poet Laureate, George Elliott Clarke, was named the Parliamentary Poet Laureate of Canada.[22]

 

Toronto’s Royal Ontario Museum will become the first major museum in Canada to digitize its collection for online viewing:

  • The Royal Ontario Museum (ROM) intends to create a digital museum online to increase access to the six million precious objects in its possession.
    • By comparison, the Art Gallery of Ontario’s entire collection comprises around 90,000 objects.
  • Even after the recent 100,000 sq. ft. “Crystal” renovation and expansion, the ROM has only 0.5% of its holdings (35,000 items) on display at one given time.
  • The ROM’s digital ambitions were inspired by other museums. More than 50 museums in North America alone have at least part of their collections available online.
  • Plans are to have 1.5 million objects available online by 2021.[23]

 

19th-Century Ivory Fan, Sample From the ROM’s Collection[24]

Ivory Fan ROM Online Collection copy

Photograph: Brian Boyle. Source: ROM

Spurred by philanthropists Judy and Wil Matthews, the Project: Under Gardiner, in partnership with The City of Toronto and Waterfront Toronto will revitalize a 1.75 kilometre stretch of space under the Gardiner from Strachan Avenue to Spadina Avenue:

  • The trail will feature farmer’s markets, gardens, gathering spots and exhibition spaces.
  • The corridor will connect seven neighbourhoods and existing parks and will make multiple cultural destinations more accessible.
  • After a public brainstorming and a vote, the name chosen for the path is “The Bentway”, in reference to the bents that are visible under the Gardiner (bents are the structures of columns and beams that support the raised highway from underneath).[25]

 

A series of murals have been painted by local artist celebrities at the mouth of the Don River as a part of the “A Love Letter to the Great Lakes” project.

  • This multi-stakeholder public art project involving Toronto Foundation, Friends of the Pan Am Path, Waterfront Toronto md StreetART Toronto has its roots in an international project titled Sea Walls: Murals for Oceans created by the PangeaSeed Foundation. Toronto’s version is the first fresh-water addition to the international project.
  • The aim is to celebrate the Great Lakes through art designed to beautify neighbourhoods, galvanize community support and stimulate a broader public awareness of the critical issues facing the Great Lakes — a source of 95% of North America’s surface freshwater.[26]

 

muralunderpass-fishunderpass-comp

Were the 2015 Pan Am/Parapan Am Games a boon or a bust for Toronto?

Despite initial sluggish tickets sales, Pan Am organizers declared the Games an unqualified success:

  • The Toronto 2015 Pan Am/Parapan Am Games were hosted by Toronto and neighbouring municipalities in July and August 2015.
  • 1.1 million or 80% of the 1.4 million tickets available were sold. Over 1 million (85%) of tickets to Pan Am Games events sold, and 89,000 (49%) of Parapan Am Games tickets.
    • 908,000 tickets were sold to the public and 21,000 to athletes’ families;
    • 113,000 were provided as part of sponsorship packages;
    • 60,000 were sold as part of the Friends of the Games program, in which donors purchased ticket packages to donate to children in underserved GTA communities; and
    • 22,000 were sold to others such as individual sponsors buying tickets to donate to children’s organizations and community groups.[27]
  • Mid-way through the Games (July 14-15), a quarter of Torontonians (27%) said they had attended or would attend an event, and almost half (46%) said they were following along on television.
    • Seniors were more likely to follow the Games on television than younger residents—57% of those 65+ versus 34% of 18-34 year olds said they were watching on television.[28]
  • About two million people took part in some live Pan Am event.[29]
  • 350,000 people attended live events in Nathan Phillips Square that were part of Panamania, a festival of cultural activities held over 23 days and featuring 130 artists.
  • The 3D Toronto sign in Nathan Phillips Square generated 100 million social media impressions.[30]
  • The Luminous Veil, a Pan Am legacy project created by artist Derek Revington spans the Prince Edward Viaduct and is one of the most ambitious light-based public artworks in the world. Its launch in summer 2015 attracted 10,000 revelers.[31]
  • 18,000 people volunteered for the Pan Am Games, and 5,000 for the Parapan Am Games (some volunteered at both).
  • About 10,000 athletes, coaches, and officials from 41 countries participated in the Games.[32] In terms of athletes competing, the Games were the largest multi-sport event in Canadian history.[33]
  • Research comparing the Pan Am/Parapan Am Games in Toronto to those in other cities and to other major sporting events shows that Toronto’s Games had the most sports, even more than at the London Summer Olympics in 2012.[34]

Comparison of Pan Am/Parapan Am Games with Selected Major International Sporting Events[35]

Comparison on Pan Am Games with Major Intnl Sporting Events

 

  • Overall, Canada earned 385 medals during both Pan Am and Parapan Am Games events.[36]
    • Canada placed second in the Parapan Am medal count with a total of 217 (78 gold, 69 silver, and 60 bronze), behind the US, which earned 265 medals.[37]
    • More than 5,500 Pan Am athletes competed in 36 sports.[38]
    • The Parapan Am Games component of the event were the largest ever in its history, with 1,608 athletes from 28 countries competing in 15 Para sports, all of which were Paralympic qualifiers for the Rio 2016 Paralympic Games.[39]
  • Local municipalities and universities invested in new facilities such as the Back Campus Fields on the University of Toronto’s St. George campus. 44% of funding for new facilities came from these financial stakeholders (with the other 56% coming from the Federal government).
  • Improvements to the city’s parks and trails for the Games created greater usability and wayfinding for users.[40]
  • Some of Toronto’s trails and underused green spaces are now linked up to create the Pan Am Path, a multi-use path that connected neighbourhoods across the city and created an active-living legacy of the Games for walkers, runners, and bikers.
    • Made up of over 80km of continuous trail across the city, the Path connected the city’s residents, local organizations, artists, and businesses to create vibrant public spaces.[41]
    • From May to August 2015, the Path came alive with an Art Relay festival of installations and events. Each week, the festival travelled across Toronto to celebrate the city’s diversity, nature, and arts.[42]
    • The City expects that once the Path is fully complete it will be used by thousands of residents every year. It has the potential to become a high profile tourist attraction in its own right.[43]
    • Pan Am Path arts programming and cross-city community building led to activations and local festivals on the Path, the engagement of organizations from across city, permanent and semi-permanent art installations, performances (dance, music, etc.), and two new permanent exhibition/art/gallery spaces.[44]

 

Pan Am Path Route Map, 2015:

panam

 

The Games also brought in some unexpected revenue. Patrols of the high-occupancy vehicle (HOV) lanes during the Pan Am Games led to thousands of tickets being issued for misuse.

  • From June 29 to July 26, Toronto Police and Ontario Provincial Police handed out 1,735 tickets for improper use of HOV lanes and 2,000 tickets for other traffic-related charges—133 tickets a day.[45]
  • Although the Games were anticipated to cause traffic disruptions, almost two-thirds (62%) of respondents in a Forum Research telephone poll midway through the Games said their daily lives had not been disrupted.
    • 38% reported that the Games did cause disruptions. An estimated 8% of Torontonians indicated that the disruptions were serious.
    • Those most likely to report disruptions were the youngest respondents (57% of 18-34 year olds versus 34% of 35-44 year olds). Of those reporting that the Games were disruptive, residents of Etobicoke or York were most likely to report very serious disruptions (33% versus less than 20% in other areas of Toronto, but the sample size was small at 66).
    • 57% disagreed with maintaining the HOV lanes after the games, while about 30% agreed.[46]
  • The Toronto Transit Commission (TTC) helped keep the city moving during the Games by implementing frequent service to all Game venues from early July to mid-August, and beginning Sunday subway service two hours earlier (at 6 a.m.) on July 19 and 26.
    • The TTC also enlisted more than 1,600 employees as customer ambassadors to help spectators reach Game venues.[47]
  • GO Transit added 378 train and 188 bus trips during the Games, resulting in a record 7,270 train trips in July 2015 and 25% more riders along the Lakeshore West and Lakeshore East lines.[48]

 

In collaboration with the Toronto Organizing Committee for the TO 2015 Pan/Parapan Am Games, the Toronto Foundation recruited 15 donors for a program called Friends of the Games.

  • These donors came together to thank the communities supporting the Games by purchasing tickets to Games events to be made available to youth through charitable organizations that work primarily in underserved communities throughout the province. Collectively, these donors contributed $1.5 million to purchase tickets so that 60,000 youth could attend the Games.
  • To disperse the tickets and get 60,000 youth to the events, Friends of the Games involved 167 charitable organizations from 28 different communities across the province.

 

mjko

 

An audit by the Province’s Auditor General found that the Games went over budget—by $342m, or 15.6% more than budgeted in the original Games bid, but also generated 32% more revenue than initially anticipated:

  • In March 2016, the Province and TO2015 (the organizing committee) estimated the Games’ cost to be $2.404b, in line with its 2009 bid budget. The Auditor General estimated the adjusted total cost at $2.529b (higher than the 2009 bid budget but within an October 2014 projection).
    • The budget for the Games was revised several times after the original 2009 bid, when costs were estimated at $2.429b ($1.429m in total expenses plus $1b for the Athletes’ Village). By October 2014 the Province and TO2015 projected a budget of $2.576b ($1.867m in expenses and $709m for the Village).
  • On September 30, 2015, the Office of the Auditor General of Ontario was asked to conduct an audit of the Pan Am/Parapan Am Games. A June 2016 special report from the Auditor details estimated costs and revenues.
  • The Auditor acknowledges that the Games gave Toronto much to be proud of: no major hitches, a legacy of infrastructure for use by athletes and the general public, a cultural legacy of artworks and commissioned sculptures, and the country’s highest-ever Pan Am/Parapan Am Games medal count. Furthermore, the development of the Athletes’ Village has reduced the timeline for the revitalization of the West Don Lands by five to 10 years.
  • The report estimates the total cost of the Games to be $2.529b—$342m or 15.6% more than the 2009 budget bid of $2.187b. The Province paid the majority of this, $304m, bringing the Province’s total contribution to the Games (not including the Athletes’ Village) to $804m, 61% more than the $500m it had committed to in the bid budget.
    • According to the Auditor, the original 2009 budget was actually $2.187b ($2.429b minus $242m for remediation and flood protection covered by separate government funding as a part of the West Don Lands revitalization; this would be paid even if the Games bid was unsuccessful).
    • Various expenses contributed to the extra costs, including $38m for transportation (e.g., creating high occupancy vehicle lanes) and $15m for promotion.
  • Over $700m was spent building and renovating sports and athletic facilities that are now accessible by communities, including 10 new internationally certified sports venues such as the Toronto Pan Am Sports Centre (jointly owned by the City and the University of Toronto Scarborough Campus) and the Milton Velodrome. But there are ongoing issues and deficiencies in some of the venues.
    • For example, as of April 2016, $815,000 is being withheld in the construction of the Toronto Tracks project due to deficiencies and non-compliance issues.
  • Revenue for the Games was $194m, 32% higher than projected in the bid budget and 13% higher than the October 2014 budget.
    • The unaudited revenue from ticket sales was $39.3m, $1.1m more than the $38.2 projected in the bid. But actual revenue after service charges paid to ticket vendors ($2.3m) was $37m, $1.2m less than projected.
    • The licensing of Games merchandise generated $2.1m in revenue (unaudited), lower than the 3.6m projected in the bid. According to the report, the shortfall is due to lack of familiarity with the Games in the province and slow pickup from retailers.
    • Revenue from sales of broadcasting rights also came under bid predictions of $2.6m with actual revenues of $300,000.
  • Unaudited actual values indicate that revenue funded 11% of the budget, more than the 10% projected in the 2009 bid and 9% in the revised October 2014 budget. Sponsorship helped make up for lower-than-expected revenue from other sources.
    • Sponsorship was 29% higher than projected—$131.612m (unaudited actual) versus $102.18m (2009 bid projected)—mostly attributed to sponsor in-kind contributions valued at $58.025m that helped relieve costs of items not in the budget but which would be paid for by TO2015 if not covered by a sponsor (such as additional advertisement).
  • The Auditor also found that the majority of HOV lanes did not have a major impact on reducing travel time—on average, a 6.1 minute decrease during the Pan Am Games and a 3.5 minute decrease during the Parapan Am Games. Greater impacts were seen Northbound on the Don Valley Parkway (DVP) and both ways on the Queen Elizabeth Way (QEW) (from 20 to 38 minutes during the Pan Am Games and eight to 27 minutes during the Parapan Am Games).
    • Temporary HOV lanes on key highways had little impact on the general public. The Ministry of Transportation measured travel time in general vehicle lanes during peak afternoon commuting times and found few major changes in travel times except on the QEW and DVP, which had up to 14-minute delays.
  • Student volunteers received incentives in the form of Ontario Student Assistance Program (OSAP) benefits, either higher funding without a necessary monetary contribution or extended repayment periods (to one year from six months). 2,500 students received one of these benefits, but the Auditor found that these incentives were provided to volunteers who may not have worked the required time—many students worked less than 50% of their shifts.
  • Despite the Games coming in $342m over budget, TO2015 paid its 53 senior employees full completion bonuses worth $5.3m, “based on the Games coming in on time and on budget.”[49]

 

Torontonians are evenly split, meanwhile, on whether the City should bid on another large-scale international event:

  • A June 2016 Forum Research survey of 882 voters in Toronto found 42% in support of Toronto making a bid to host Expo 2025, and 43% opposing.
  • Support was highest among respondents aged 35-44 (at 54%) and those with a lower income (50%).[50]

 

How does our world-class library system serve the city?

The Toronto Public Library (TPL) continues to be among the world’s largest and busiest public library systems offering services in complex, diverse, urban environments:

  • 2015 was another landmark year for the TPL.
    • It opened its 100th branch, in the Scarborough Civic Centre.
    • Driven by increases in e-circulation, wireless usage, and virtual visits, total uses (including visits, circulation, in-library use, reference requests, program attendance, virtual visits, workstation user sessions, wireless sessions, and licensed database searches) surpassed 102 million, up 1.7% from 2014 and 12.6% from 2005.
    • Total circulation increased by 1.5% in 2015 (but has decreased 2.2% over the past five years).
  • Although total visits were down again in 2015, by 1.0% (18,153,058 compared to 18,335,910 in 2014), they still grew by 6.0% over the past decade.
    • While browsing and borrowing books continue to be key drivers of library activity, Torontonians also visit branches to use computers and access wireless internet, to study and to work, to network and to attend programs and community events.
  • As more and more content is offered online, physical circulation and in-library use of materials is rapidly falling.
    • Since 2011, physical circulation has fallen 14.1%, but electronic circulation has increased by a staggering 740%.
    • The decline in physical circulation is attributed to a drop in the use of multilingual materials as more of it becomes available online and immigrants move to the 905.
    • In-library use of materials fell 11.1% in 2015 (from 6,631,255 in 2015 to 5,892,962), while electronic circulation rose 26.0% (to 4,395,657, up from 3,488,252 in 2014).

 

5-Year Trends in Physical and Electronic Circulation, 2011-2015:

circulation

  • Other notable increases in library usage in 2015 included:
    • 36.8% increase in wireless sessions (to 3,227,441), reinforcing the library’s vital role in bridging the digital divide. Wireless use has increased by 116.1% over the past four years.

 

Four-Year Trend in Wireless Use, 2012-2015:

wireless

 

  • 9.7% increase in program offerings (to 37,080 programs) and an 8.9% increase in program attendance (to 925,417 attendees).
  • The number of programs offered has increased by 16.6% over the past five years and attendance by 6.9%. Over the past 10 years, programs offerings have increased by a whopping 53.7% and attendance by 44.7%.
    • 9.6% increase in registration in the TD Summer Reading Club.
    • 4.3% increase in virtual visits (reaching 31,248,327, up from 29,966,097 the previous year), reflecting the importance of online access to information, services, and collection.
  • Total virtual visits—visits to TPL’s main site and specialized sites (e.g., Kids Space), e-content sites (including e-books and e-magazines), licensed databases, and the library’s online social media channels—have increased 33.5% over the last five years.
  • In 2014 (the latest year for which comparative data is available) TPL ranked first in library use (circulation and visits per capita), number of branches, and square footage per capita across all libraries in North America serving populations of two million or more.
  • In Canada, TPL ranked first in 2014 in overall visits and circulation, second in visits per capita, sixth in circulation per capita, and second in square footage per capita amongst libraries serving over 500,000.[51]
    • Although lower than in 2013, circulation per capita in the TPL system in 2014 was above the national average (11.03) and median across monitored Canadian libraries (11.03) at 11.41 (versus 11.6 in 2013).[52]
    • Library visits per capita in 2014 measured 6.53, above the national average (6.03) and median (6.06).[53]
  • Of the eight municipal libraries voluntarily participating in the 2014 Ontario Municipal Benchmarking Initiative, TPL placed first in library use per capita, and ranked sixth in operating cost per use ($1.98, down from $2.04 in 2013).[54]

 

The Toronto Public Library has made the internet more accessible by offering portable hot spots for loan:

  • Six branches in underserved neighbourhoods have the service.
  • The loans are free just as with books and can be “signed out” for up to six months.
  • 11 per cent of Canadians responding to a CRTC survey have no home internet service.
  • ACORN Canada has been advocating for the CRTC to mandate $10 per month high-speed options.[55]

 

How does arts and culture contribute to the city’s economic health?

Arts and culture provide employment and professional development, marketing, and advocacy opportunities for creatives:

  • Although professional employment in arts and culture in Toronto declined 4.9% in 2014 to 32,970 people (down from 34,660 in 2013), it remains 2% higher than in 2012.
  • When the self-employed are included, the number of professionals in arts and culture almost doubles, to 65,170 in 2014 (down from 65,670 in 2013 but also higher than 2012’s 61,780).[56]

 

The value of the conservation work that goes into sustaining Toronto’s historical properties almost doubled in 2015:

  • In 2015 2,157 heritage permit applications were processed, compared to 2,082 in 2014, a 3.6% increase.
  • The value of conservation work (through development and incentives) increased by 94.2%, from $9,065,511 in 2014 to $17,605,220 in 2015.
  • 188 properties requested heritage evaluation in 2015 and 39 new properties were added to the Heritage Register, compared to 26 properties requesting evaluation in 2014 and 25 new properties added.[57]
  • The Ontario Heritage Act allows municipalities to pass bylaws to designate properties with cultural heritage value as “heritage properties.” The designation indicates that a property has heritage value, allows for conservation and protection of it, encourages stewardship, and promotes knowledge of the property.
    • Properties can be identified by the municipality, a property owner, an individual, or a community group and must go through an evaluation to be designated a heritage property. Properties that can be designated include buildings and structures, groups of buildings, cemeteries, landscapes, ruins, and archaeological sites.[58]
  • Toronto’s Heritage Preservation Services department compiles a list of properties showcasing our cultural heritage in the Heritage Register. The Register, started in 1973, includes landmark buildings, heritage districts, and private homes. “Listed” properties are those that City Council has recommended for evaluation, and “designated” properties are those that have been designated under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act or are located within a Heritage Conservation District designated under Part V.[59]
  • Heritage permits are required when property owners want to make any changes (excluding general maintenance) to the outer appearance of a house in a Heritage Conservation District or a heritage property that can be viewed from the street. This may include replacing a window or door, installing new siding or skylights, or altering current brickwork.[60]

 

The City has been awarded for its sustained commitment to heritage conservation:

  • The City received the 2016 Prince of Wales Prize. Named after Prince Charles, the prize is awarded annually to a municipal government in recognition of its efforts (e.g., regulation, policies, and funding) towards stewardship of historical places.[61]

 

On-location filming in Toronto exceeded $1b for the fifth straight year:

  • Toronto’s screen-based industry (film, television, commercials, and animation) continued its success in 2015, with domestic and international production companies investing a record $1.55b in on-location filming in the city.
  • Film and television productions continued to dominate, accounting for $1.06b of the total investment. $1.47m was invested in music videos, $145m in animation, and $345m in commercials.
  • Shooting days totaled 6,680.[62]

 

The 23rd annual Hot Docs festival drew record audience numbers:

  • 2016 audiences for Toronto’s documentary festival grew to 211,000 at 462 public screenings of 232 films (of 2,735 submitted) on 15 screens over 11 days, with 310 guest filmmakers and subjects in attendance.
    • The Docs for School program offered free in-theatre and in-school screenings to 92,500 students.[63]
  • An economic impact study of the 2015 Hot Docs festival and related events on Ontario’s GDP shows that it contributed $33.3m, an 11% increase from the first festival impact study in 2013. The study reported:
    • $6.4m in attendee expenditure (12.3% of public attendees were visiting Toronto);
    • $6.6m in industry delegate expenditure;
    • $16.1m in Canadian business deals;
    • 469 jobs created (a 13.6% increase from the 2013 impact study); and
    • $14.4m in tax revenue (10.8% increase from 2013).[64]

 

The 10th edition of Toronto’s Nuit Blanche festival had major impacts and achievements:

  • The reputation of Scotiabank Nuit Blanche, North America’s largest free contemporary art festival, continues to grow, as does its coverage of the city’s neighbourhoods.[65]
    • Since 2006, Scotiabank Nuit Blanche has included more than 1,300 art installations from almost 4,600 artists and had an economic impact of over $268m.[66]
  • The 2015 edition had an economic impact of $41.5m and over one million attendees, including 205,000 from out of town.
  • The festival featured 110 art projects by nearly 400 artists[67] and received media coverage from as far away as Mexico, Brazil, Italy, the UK, Korea, and Japan.[68]
  • For the third year, Extended Projects allowed residents and visitors the opportunity to participate for 10 days after the main event. This year hundreds of thousands took advantage, taking in works such as Your Eye Inside Out, and Ekow Nimako’s Silent Knight.[69]

 

With 2016 marking Luminato Festival’s 10 year anniversary, the festival this year at the Hearn Generating Station was the best yet according to BlogTO, and saw:

  • the highest earned income in Luminato’s history ($1.3m), 35% higher than the average over the 9 previous years, as well as its biggest single cash donation ever received;
  • 40% of its 2016 corporate partners invest in Luminato for the first time;
  • Attendance from out of town visitors up across all origins over 2015 (rest of Canada, i.e. outside Ontario, up by 53%; US attendance up by 28%, and overseas attendance up by 413%);
  • Its estimated economic impact (GDP) up 44% over 2015 (at $102.6m), and;
  • Its total tax contribution generated up by 257% from 2015 (to $42.3m, total taxes).[70]

 


 

 

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